Spectrotherapy

Spectrotherapy is a brand new approach to healthcare which utilises specific frequencies of light from the visible spectrum.  The technique is non-invasive, easy to use in the home or office and completely harmless.

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

For some years now people who suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) or the winter blues, have been using white light boxes to increase their levels of a neurotransmitter called Serotonin. This is one of the most important chemicals associated with mood and its production is known to be dependent on available sunlight. When the levels of sunlight are reduced around October to February, the production of Serotonin is reduced and many people feel depressed. In countries where there are very low levels of sunlight, such as Northern Europe, depression and indeed suicide rates escalate. By exposure to artificial white light boxes the levels of Serotonin increase and depression can be alleviated.

How we can help

We at the Belvedere Centre took it upon ourselves to try and discover which part of the spectrum these patients were benefiting from. Through painstaking research we concluded that the important part of the spectrum was in the violet range. By exposing patients to the relevant frequency, Serotonin levels were increased in a fraction of the time it took for exposure to white light.

Each colour of the spectrum has a complimentary colour, i.e. the opposite colour in the ‘colour wheel’. Our research found that this complimentary colour could be used to reduce the levels of Serotonin in patients suffering from conditions associated with high levels of Serotonin such as migraine.

How does it work?

Whilst the mechanism of the therapeutic effects of specific frequencies of light is uncertain, it is known that light can enter the body via receptors in the skin. Photons produced by light affect biological tissue forming biophotons which affect the cells. According to research performed in Russia, these receptors coincide with acupuncture points on the body and can penetrate to depths of up to 3cms depending on the frequency. Using complex photomultipliers and photometers they were able to trace the destination of the light to other areas of the same acupuncture meridian. This research would appear to corroborate many of our clinical findings and has enabled us to treat patients in a variety of ways.

How do I use Spectrotherapy?

A light pad is used in conjunction with coloured acetate. The light pad needs to be of a particular brightness to achieve the required effect and is merely placed within arm’s length of the patient such that the colour enters the peripheral vision. The patient is not required to stare into the light and can simultaneously read, watch TV etc.  whilst the light is being administered. The usual treatment time is between 5 and 10 minutes although longer periods may be required for some conditions.

Please note:
Spectrotherapy should only be used in conjunction with and not independently from treatment and advice from your general practitioner.

Spectrotherapy is a brand new approach to healthcare which utilizes specific frequencies of light from the visible spectrum.  The technique is non-invasive, easy to use in the home or office and completely harmless.

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD)

For some years now people who suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) or the winter blues, have been using white light boxes to increase their levels of a neurotransmitter called Serotonin. This is one of the most important chemicals associated with mood and its production is known to be dependent on available sunlight. When the levels of sunlight are reduced around October to February, the production of Serotonin is reduced and many people feel depressed. In countries where there are very low levels of sunlight, such as Northern Europe, depression and indeed suicide rates escalate. By exposure to artificial white light boxes the levels of Serotonin increase and depression can be alleviated.

How we can help

We at the Belvedere Centre took it upon ourselves to try and discover which part of the spectrum these patients were benefiting from. Through painstaking research we concluded that the important part of the spectrum was in the violet range. By exposing patients to the relevant frequency, Serotonin levels were increased in a fraction of the time it took for exposure to white light.

Each colour of the spectrum has a complimentary colour, i.e. the opposite colour in the ‘colour wheel’. Our research found that this complimentary colour could be used to reduce the levels of Serotonin in patients suffering from conditions associated with high levels of Serotonin such as migraine.

How does it work?

Whilst the mechanism of the therapeutic effects of specific frequencies of light is uncertain, it is known that light can enter the body via receptors in the skin. Photons produced by light affect biological tissue forming biophotons which affect the cells. According to research performed in Russia, these receptors coincide with acupuncture points on the body and can penetrate to depths of up to 3cms depending on the frequency. Using complex photomultipliers and photometers they were able to trace the destination of the light to other areas of the same acupuncture meridian. This research would appear to corroborate many of our clinical findings and has enabled us to treat patients in a variety of ways.

How do I use Spectrotherapy?

A light pad is used in conjunction with coloured acetate. The light pad needs to be of a particular brightness to achieve the required effect and is merely placed within arm’s length of the patient such that the colour enters the peripheral vision. The patient is not required to stare into the light and can simultaneously read, watch TV etc.  whilst the light is being administered. The usual treatment time is between 5 and 10 minutes although longer periods may be required for some conditions.

Please note:

Spectrotherapy should only be used in conjunction with and not independently from treatment and advice from your general practitioner.